Science

At Simpsons Lane we have adopted the science capital teaching approach, which engages students with science and promotes social justice.  We aim to make science relevant to the lives of our children and allow them to engage with the subject, whilst providing them with the secure subject knowledge and the skills that they need.  Our aim with this is to contribute in addressing long-standing patterns regarding who continues with science during secondary education and post-16, supporting future skills shortages and social mobility.  Through this approach we will establish lifelong learners and raise the aspirations of our learners by demonstrating the endless possibilities the subject holds.  

We aim to encapsulate all of the science-related knowledge (what you know), attitudes (what you think), experiences (what you do) and social contacts (who you know) that an individual may have, which will enhance their science capital.

Pupils will:

  • Be given the knowledge and understanding of science and how science works
  • Will identify and see how science is relevant to their everyday life
  • Apply science knowledge and skills
  • Engage with science-related media
  • Participate in out-of-school science learning contexts as well as in school experiences
  • Identify with science-related skills, qualifications, jobs and interests
  • Know people in science related roles
  • Talk about science in everyday life
  • Share their science-related hobbies

At Simpsons Lane we believe in a broad and balanced curriculum.  Within science lessons, we aim to stimulate and excite pupils’ curiosity about the world around them and give them the opportunity to explore this, linking these ideas with practical experiences.  We teach science vocabulary and knowledge to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the words and learning crucial to developing their understanding through the breadth of the topics taught.  Big questions and cross curricular opportunities in reading, writing and maths allow pupils to apply and reinforce previously taught skills.

Long Term Plan

Year group

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

1

Animals, including humans

Animals including humans

Plants

Everyday materials

Everyday materials

Seasonal changes

2

Animals including humans

Animals including humans

Plants

All living things and their habitats

Everyday materials

Everyday materials

3

Animals including humans

Plants

Plants

Rocks

Forces and magnets

Light

 

4

Animals, including humans

Living things and their habitats

States of matter

States of matter

Electricity

Light

5

Animals including humans

All living things and their habitats

Properties and change in materials

Properties and change in materials

Forces

Earth and Space

6

Animals including humans

All living things and their habitats

Evolution and inheritance

Evolution and Inheritance

Electricity

Medium Term Plan 

Science Year 1

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

Animals, including Humans

Animals, including Humans

Plants

Everyday Materials

Seasonal Change

•       Name common animals

•       Carnivores, etc

•       Human body and senses

•       Common plants

•       Plant structure

•       Properties of materials

•       Grouping materials

•       The four seasons

•       Seasonal weather

•     Know how to classify a range of animals by amphibian, reptile, mammal, fish and birds

•     Know and classify animals by what they eat (carnivore, herbivore and omnivore)

•     Know how to sort by living and non-living things

•     Know the name of parts of the human body that can be seen

•     Know and name a variety of common wild and garden plants

•     Know and name the petals, stem, leaves and root of a plant

•     Know and name the roots, trunk, branches and leaves of a tree

•     Know the name of the materials an object is made from

•     Know about the properties of everyday materials

•     Name the seasons and know about the type of weather in each season

 

Year 1

Working Scientifically

q  Ask questions such as:

•    Why are flowers different colours?

•    Why do some animals eat meat and others do not?

q  Set up a test to see which materials keeps things warmest, know if the test has been successful and can say what has been learned

q  Explain to someone what has been learned from an investigation they have been

involved with and draw conclusions from the answers to the questions asked

q  Measures (within Year 1 mathematical limits) to help find out more about the investigations undertaken

Science Year 2

Biology

Chemistry

Animals, including

Humans

Plants

All living things and

their habitats

Everyday Materials

•       Animal reproduction

•       Healthy living

•       Basic needs

•       Plant and seed growth

•       Plant reproduction

•       Keeping plants healthy

•       Alive or dead

•       Habitats

•       Adaptations

•       Food chains

•       Identify different materials

•       Name everyday materials

•       Properties of materials

•       Compare the use of different materials

•       Compare movement on different surfaces

•     Know the basic stages in a life cycle for animals, (including humans)

•     Know why exercise, a balanced diet and good hygiene are important for humans

•     Know and explain how seeds and bulbs grow into plants

•     Know what plants need in order to grow and stay healthy (water, light & suitable temperature)

•     Classify things by living, dead or never lived

•     Know how a specific habitat provides for the basic needs of things living there (plants and animals)

•     Match living things to their habitat

•     Name some different sources of food for animals

•     Know about and explain a simple food chain

•     Know how materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching

•     Know why a material might or might not be used for a specific job

 

Year 2

Working Scientifically

q  Ask questions such as:

•    Why do some trees lose their leaves in Autumn and others do not?

•    How long are roots of tall trees?

•    Why do some animals have underground habitats?

q  Use equipment such as thermometers and rain gauges to help observe changes to local environment as the year progresses

q  Use microscopes to find out more about small creatures and plants

q  Know how to set up a fair test and do so when finding out about how seeds grow best

q  Classify or group things according to a given criteria, e.g. deciduous and coniferous trees

q  Draw conclusions from fair tests and explain what has been found out

q  Use measures (within Year 2 mathematical limits) to help find out more about the investigations they are engaged with

Science Year 3

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

Animals, including humans

Plants

Plants

Rocks

Forces

Light

•       Skeleton and muscles

•       Nutrition

•       Exercise and health

•       Plant life

•       Basic structure and functions

•       Life cycle

•       Water transportation

•       Fossil formation

•       Compare and group rocks

•       Soil

•       Different Forces

•       Magnets

•       Reflections

•       Shadows

•     Know about the importance of a nutritious, balanced diet

•     Know how nutrients, water and oxygen are transported within animals and humans

•     Know about the skeletal and muscular system of a human

•     Know the function of different parts of flowing plants and trees

•     Know how water is transported within plants

•     Know the plant life cycle, especially the importance of flowers

•     Compare and group rocks based on their appearance and physical properties, giving reasons

•     Know how soil is made and how fossils are formed

•     Know about and explain the difference between sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rock

•     Know about and describe how objects move on different surfaces

•     Know how a simple pulley works and use to on to lift an object

•     Know how some forces require contact and some do not, giving examples

•     Know about and explain how magnets attract and repel Predict whether magnets will attract or repel and give a reason

•     Know that dark is the absence of light

•     Know that light is needed in order to see and is reflected from a surface

•     Know and demonstrate how a shadow is formed and explain how a shadow changes shape

•     Know about the danger of direct sunlight and describe how to keep protected

Year 3

Working Scientifically

q  Ask questions such as:

•     Why does the moon appear as different shapes in the night sky?

•     Why do shadows change during the day?

•     Where does a fossil come from?

q  Use a thermometer to measure temperature and know there are two main scales used to measure temperature

q    Gather and record information using a chart, matrix or tally chart, depending on what is most sensible

q  Observe at what time of day a shadow is likely to be at its longest and shortest

q  Group information according to common factors e.g. plants that grow in woodlands or plants that grow in gardens

q  Observe which type of plants grow in different places e.g.

bluebells in woodland, roses in domestic gardens, etc.

q  Use bar charts and other statistical tables (in line with Year

3 mathematics statistics) to record findings

q  Use research to find out how reflection can help us see things that are around the corner

q  Know how to use a key to help understand information presented on a chart

q  Use research to find out what the main differences are between sedimentary and igneous rocks

q  Be confident to stand in front of others and explain what has been found out, for example about how the moon changes shape

q  Test to see which type of soil is most suitable when growing two similar plants

q  Present findings using written explanations and include diagrams when needed

q  Test to see if their right hand is as efficient as their left hand

q  Make sense of findings and draw conclusions which help them to understand more about scientific information

q  Set up a fair test with different variables e.g. the best conditions for a plant to grow

q  Amend predictions according to findings

q  Explain to a partner why a test is a fair one e.g. lifting

weights with right and left hand, etc.

q  Be prepared to change ideas as a result of what has been

found out during a scientific enquiry

q  Measure carefully (taking account of mathematical knowledge up to Year 3) and add to scientific learning

Science Year 4

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

Animals, including humans

All living things and their habitats

States of Matter

Electricity

Sound

•       Digestive system

•       Teeth

•       Food chains

•       Grouping living things

•       Classification keys

•       Adaptation of living things

•       Compare and group materials

•       Solids, liquids and gases

•       Changing state

•       Water cycle

•       Uses of electricity

•       Simple circuits and switches

•       Conductors and insulators

•       How sounds are made

•       Sound vibrations

•       Pitch and Volume

•     Identify and name the parts of the human digestive system

•     Know the functions of the organs in the human digestive system

•     Identify and know the different types of human teeth

•     Know the functions of different human teeth

•     Use and construct food chains to identify producers, predators and prey

•     Use classification keys to group, identify and name living things

•     Know how changes to an environment could endanger living things

•     Group materials based on their state of matter (solid, liquid, gas

•     Know the temperature at which materials change state

•     Know about and explore how some materials can change state

•     Know the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle

•     Identify and name appliances that require electricity to function

•     Construct a series circuit

•     Identify and name the components in a series circuit (including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers)

•     Predict and test whether a lamp will light within a circuit

•     Know the function of a switch

•     Know the difference between a conductor and an insulator; giving examples of each

•     Know how sound is made, associating some of them with vibrating

•     Know how sound travels from a source to our ears

•     Know the correlation between pitch and the object producing a sound

•     Know the correlation between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it

•     Know what happens to a sound as it travels away from its source

Year 4

Working Scientifically

q  Ask questions such as:

•     Why are steam and ice the same thing?

•     Why is the liver important in the digestive systems?

•     What do we mean by ‘pitch’ when it comes to sound?

q  Gather and record information using a chart, matrix or tally chart, depending on what is most sensible

q  Group information according to common factors e.g. materials that make good conductors or insulators

q  Use research to find out how much time it takes to digest most of our food

q    Use bar charts and other statistical tables (in line with Year 4 mathematics statistics) to record findings

q  Use research to find out which materials make effective conductors and insulators of electricity

q  Present findings using written explanations and include diagrams, when needed

q  Carry out tests to see, for example, which of two instruments make the highest or lowest sounds and to see if a glass of ice weighs the same as a glass of water

q  Write up findings using a planning, doing and evaluating process

q  Set up a fair test with more than one variable e.g. using different materials to cut out sound

q  Make sense of findings and draw conclusions which helps them understand more about the scientific information that has been learned

q  Explain to others why a test that has been set up is a fair one e.g. discover how fast ice melts in different temperatures

q  When making predictions there are plausible reasons as to why they have done so

q  Measure carefully (taking account of mathematical knowledge up to Year 4) and add to scientific learning

q  Able to amend predictions according to findings

q  Use a data logger to check on the time it takes ice to melt to water in different temperatures

q  Prepared to change ideas as a result of what has been found out during a scientific enquiry

q  Use a thermometer to measure temperature and know there are two main scales used to measure temperature

Science Year 5

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

All living things and their habitats

Animals, including humans

Properties and changes in materials

Forces

Earth and Space

•       Life cycles – plants and animals

•       Reproductive processes

•       Famous naturalists

•       Changes as humans develop from birth to old age

•       Compare properties of everyday materials

•       Soluble/ dissolving

•       Reversible and irreversible substances

•       Gravity

•       Friction

•       Forces and motion of mechanical devices

•       Movement of the Earth and the planets

•       Movement of the Moon

•       Night and day

•     Know the life cycle of different living things e.g. mammal, amphibian, insect and bird

•     Know the differences between different life cycles

•     Know the process of reproduction in plants

•     Know the process of reproduction in animals

•     Create a timeline to indicate stages of growth in humans

•       Compare and group materials based on their properties (e.g. hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity, [electrical & thermal], and response to magnets

•       Know and explain how a material dissolves to form a solution

•       Know and show how to recover a substance from a solution

•       Know and demonstrate how some materials can be separated (e.g. through filtering, sieving and evaporating)

•       Know and demonstrate that some changes are reversible and some are not

•       Know how some changes result in the formation of a new material and that this is usually irreversible

•     Know what gravity is and its impact on our lives

•     Identify and know the effect of air and water resistance

•     Identify and know the effect of friction

•     Explain how levers, pulleys and gears allow a smaller force to have a greater effect

•     Know about and explain the movement of the Earth and other planets relative to the Sun

•     Know about and explain the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth

•     Know and demonstrate how night and day are created

•     Describe the Sun, Earth and Moon (using the term spherical)

Year 5

Working Scientifically

q  Set up an investigation when it is appropriate e.g. finding out which materials dissolve or not

q  Able to present information related to scientific enquiries in a range of ways including using IT such as power-point and iMovie

q  Set up a fair test when needed e.g. which surfaces

create most friction?

q  Use diagrams, as and when necessary, to support

writing

q  Set up an enquiry based investigation e.g. find out what adults / children can do now that they couldn’t when a baby

q  Is evaluative when explaining findings from scientific enquiry

q  Know what the variables are in a given enquiry and can isolate each one when investigating e.g. finding out how effective parachutes are when made with different materials

q  Clear about what has been found out from recent enquiry and can relate this to other enquiries, where appropriate

q  Use all measurements as set out in Year 5 mathematics (measurement), including capacity and mass

q  Their explanations set out clearly why something has happened and its possible impact on other things

q  Use other scientific instruments as needed e.g. thermometer, rain gauge, spring scales (for measuring Newtons)

q  Able to give an example of something focused on when supporting a scientific theory e.g. how much easier it is to lift a heavy object using pulleys

q  Able to record data and present them in a range of ways including diagrams, labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs and bar and line graphs

q  Keep an on-going record of new scientific words that they have come across for the first time

q  Make predictions based on information gleaned from investigations

q  Able to relate causal relationships when, for example, studying life cycles

q  Create new investigations which take account of what has been learned previously

q  Frequently carry out research when investigating a scientific principle or theory

Science Year 6

Biology

Physics

Animals, including humans

All living things and their habitats

Evolution and Inheritance

Electricity

Light

•       The circulatory system

•       Water transportation

•       Impact of exercise on body

•       Classification of living things and the reasons for it

•       Identical and non-identical off-spring

•       Fossil evidence and evolution

•       Adaptation and evolution

•       Electrical components

•       Simple circuits

•       Fuses and voltage

•       How light travels

•       Reflection

•       Ray models of light

•     Identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system

•     Know the function of the heart, blood vessels and blood

•     Know the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on health

•     Know the ways in which nutrients and water are transported in animals, including humans

•     Classify living things into broad groups according to observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences

•     Know how living things have been classified

•     Give reasons for classifying plants and animals in a specific way

•     Know how the Earth and living things have changed over time

•     Know how fossils can be used to find out about the past

•     Know about reproduction and offspring (recognising that offspring normally vary and are not identical to their parents)

•     Know how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment

•     Link adaptation over time to evolution

•     Know about evolution and can explain what it is

•     Compare and give reasons for why components work and do not work in a circuit

•     Draw circuit diagrams using correct symbols

•     Know how the number and voltage of cells in a circuit links to the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer

•     Know how light travels

•     Know and demonstrate how we see objects

•     Know why shadows have the same shape as the object that casts them

•     Know how simple optical instruments work e.g. periscope, telescope, binoculars, mirror, magnifying glass etc.

Year 6

Working Scientifically

q  Know which type of investigation is needed to suit particular scientific enquiry e.g. looking at the relationship between pulse and exercise

q  Use a range of written methods to report findings, including focusing on the planning, doing and evaluating phases

q  Set up a fair test when needed e.g. does light travel in straight lines?

q  Clear about what has been found out from their enquiry and can relate this to others in class

q  Know how to set up an enquiry based investigation

e.g. what is the relationship between oxygen and blood?

q  Explanations set out clearly why something has happened and its possible impact on other things

q  Know what the variables are in a given enquiry and can isolate each one when investigating

q  Aware of the need to support conclusions with evidence

q  Justify which variable has been isolated in scientific investigation

q  Keep an on-going record of new scientific words that they have come across for the first time and use these regularly in future scientific write ups

q  Use all measurements as set out in Year 6 mathematics (measurement), including capacity, mass, ratio and proportion

q  Use diagrams, as and when necessary, to support writing and be confident enough to present findings orally in front of the class

q  Able to record data and present them in a range of ways including diagrams, labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs and bar and line graphs

q  Able to give an example of something they have focused on when supporting a scientific theory e.g. classifying vertebrate and invertebrate creatures or why certain creatures choose their unique habitats

q  Make accurate predictions based on information gleaned from their investigations and create new investigations as a result

q  Frequently carry out research when investigating a scientific principle or theory